An update on a classic.

Talk about today's strip, or anything about the comic in general. You can also talk about any of the characters... but don't expect a response. They're FICTIONAL, you guys... sheesh. :)
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Blaze
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An update on a classic.

Post by Blaze » Wed Nov 22, 2006 1:24 am

Because I got the idea and could no longer resist it. (BTW: I know the window is screwed up a little. Pain in the butt to fix it.)

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Lizzegirle
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Post by Lizzegirle » Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:10 am

I was really disturbed for a moment there because I thought "The King" was "servicing" Greg. So I thought Greg was "getting his service on". Gross. :shifty:
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Post by Deacon » Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:48 am

Liz's mind is filthy.

I like it.

Posted Tue Nov 21, 2006 8:49 pm:

PS Blaze, you're unfamiliar with Comic Sans?
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Re: An update on a classic.

Post by Lizzegirle » Wed Nov 22, 2006 3:01 am

Ahem... Greg does not use Comic Sans. Comic Sans in the DEVIL.
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Post by dmpotter » Wed Nov 22, 2006 4:32 am

I suppose Blaze could have changed it since Deacon commented, but that certainly looks like [font=Comic Sans MS]Comic Sans MS[/font] to me. Although it should be in ALL CAPS to really be in comic-form.

But yes, Comic Sans MS is an evil font with almost no practical use. According to Liz's link, it was originally created for use with Clippy, which hints at possibly demonic origins.

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Post by Blaze » Wed Nov 22, 2006 5:24 am

[quote="Lizzegirle";p="694881"]I was really disturbed for a moment there because I thought "The King" was "servicing" Greg. So I thought Greg was "getting his service on". Gross. :shifty:[/quote]

Here I created funnay and you had to go and turn it into a nightmare. :(

I hate you FOREVER! :cry:
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Post by StruckingFuggle » Wed Nov 22, 2006 5:29 am

But yes, Comic Sans MS is an evil font with almost no practical use.
Other than Courier New, what sort of fonts have practical uses to be considered instead of just looks...? o.o And what's so wrong with Comic Sans MS?

Also: Blaze: GAHHH

Liz: GAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH*scrubrain*
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Post by dmpotter » Wed Nov 22, 2006 5:35 am

Most fonts are designed with a reason. Tahoma and Verdana were designed to be easy to read on a computer monitor. (I think Trebuchet MS falls into this category too.) I'm fairly sure Microsoft has created other fonts designed to be easy to read on computers for Vista.

Other fonts (like Times New Roman) are designed to be easy to read on the printed page. Some fonts (like Arial) are designed to be used for headlines/titles.

Comic Sans MS was supposed to look cartoony, wound up just being hard to read, and essentially useless.

I'll bet Liz can go into typography in far more depth than I can, but most fonts do actually have some sort of readability and use goal.

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Post by Lizzegirle » Wed Nov 22, 2006 9:38 am

Actually, I'm currently taking a typography class (one of three) and we discussed this pretty thoroughly. Dmpotter is right. There is and entire history to typography that I think most people don't realize. There are seven classification categories for all sorts of fonts.

Humanist: These typefaces have an elegance and classicism and work well as text faces alongside blackletter display type.

You can identify these faces by the sloped bar on the lower case e and their slanted axis [stress]. Humanist faces are the lowest contrast [that means there is the least difference between thick and thin parts of the stroke] of the serif text faces.

Typefaces: Berkeley Oldstyle, Centaur, Horley Old Style, Jenson, Kennerly, Stempel Schneidler.

Garalde: These are faces are similar to Humanist faces but they have moved one step away from the pen-drawn qualities of those faces. Unlike Humanist faces, these faces have a horizontal bar on the e and greater contrast between their thicks and thins. Their axis is only slightly sloped.

Typefaces: Aldus, Bembo, Galliard, Garamond, Goudy, Granjon, Minion, Plantin, Sabon, Times New Roman.

Transitional: Transitionals [along with Garaldes] are some of the most commonly used text faces today. The designs of these faces emphasized the mechanical rather than the calligraphic. They are called Transitional because they are the faces that bridged the gap from "Old style" faces [Humanist and Garalde] to the next category of type which is called "Modern."

You can identify Transitional faces by their higher contrast, larger apertures [counters], larger x-heights and their vertical axis [stress].

Typefaces: Baskerville, Caslon, Fournier, Janson, Joanna, Melior, Meridien, Perpetua, Versailles

Didone [Modern]: Unlike the text faces from all the categories that came before them, most Didones work better at display sizes than at text sizes because their thins break up at small sizes. Some digital versions of these types have been designed with a lower contrast version for use at text sizes and higher contrast version for use at display sizes to resolve this issue.

Didones are easily identified. They have the highest contrast of all the type classifications. The serifs on Didones are horizontal, unbrackected hairlines. Also note the ball terminals on the arms of the a, c, f, r and the ear of the g.

Typefaces: Bodoni, Didot, Fairfield, Fenice, Filosofia, Walbaum


Slab serif: The name says it all for this category—these are the faces with heavy square serifs that were designed in the early 1800s to meet the demands of a newly industrialized society. With this relationship to the Industrial Revolution, these faces have a real "workhorse" feel about them. Responding to an interest in Egypt following Napoleon's conquest of that country, a London type foundry called these faces "Egyptian" and the name has stuck.

Slab serifs were widely used on broadside posters, handbills and advertising during the Industrial Revolution. In addition, Napoleon reportedly used these faces in message relays because they were clear enough for his soldiers to see through telescopes over long distances.

There are three kinds of slab serif types. Regular slab serifs are low in contrast [strokes and serifs are often the same thickness] and have unbracketed slab serifs. Clarendons have bracketed slab serifs, a bit more contrast and ball terminals. Typewriter faces are monospaced slab serifs.

Typefaces: Serifa, Glypha, Egyptienne, Rockwell, Chaparral, PMN Caecilia, Clarendon, Prestige Elite, Courier, Trixie


Lineale: The sixth Vox classification, Lineale, is more commonly called sans serif. Within this category there are four subcategories that show how sans serifs evolved: Grotesque, Neo-grotesque, Geometric and Humanist.

You can identify Grotesques by their 2-story lower case g. Compared to Univers or Helvetica, these faces have a rougher, unadorned look yet, because of their origins in the 19th century they never seem overly plain or stiff.

Typefaces: Bureau Grotesque, Franklin Gothic, News Gothic, Trade Gothic, HTF Knockout

These faces are similar to Grotesques but they have a little less contrast and a single-story lower case g. Their lower contrast gives these faces a more "designed" look because they have taken one step away from the modulation of pen-drawn strokes. The jaws of letters like C are slightly more open than in Grotesques

Typefaces: Akzidenz Grotesk, Helvetica, Univers

Lineale Geometric have very low contrast [most have almost none] and are constructed of purely geometric shapes without reference to pen-drawn forms. Most Lineale Geometric faces have a single-story lower case a and for this reason, they do not make very legible text faces.

Typefaces: Avant Garde, Avenir, Eurostile, Futura, Kabel

Humanist sans serifs drew upon the best features of roman type [serif text faces] and sans serif type in order to bridge the gap between these two very different typographic genres. With Futura, Geometric Lineales had taken sans serif type to its extreme form of mechanical rigidity. Lineale Humanist faces began the return to more human-oriented letterforms with greater modulation in strokes. These faces are more legible and have a warmer feeling than any of the other kinds of Lineales.

Many Lineale Humanist faces have a true-drawn italic rather than an oblique companion face. Slanted roman forms are called oblique. The Lineales we've studied up to now have all had obliques. A true-drawn [or genuine] italic is one where the italic letterforms are distinct forms rather than slanted versions of the roman forms. By the way, most serif text faces have a genuine italic companion face.

In addition, several of the Lineale Humanist typefaces designed in the late twentieth century have matching small caps and old-style figures. The availability of a true italic, small caps and old-style figures in these Lineale Humanist faces also contribute to their warmth and flexibility.

Typefaces: Gill Sans, Frutiger, Meta, Myriad, Optima, Rotis Sans, Scala Sans, Syntax, TheSans

Glyphic: These are faces that are based on chiseled or cut letterforms rather than pen-drawn forms. They typically have small, sharp serifs. As you may recall from Module 1, our upper case letterforms came from the inscribed forms on Trajan's column. Majuscules had fewer curves to facilitate carving. This is why many Glyphic typefaces contain only capital letterforms or small caps. Glyphic typefaces are intended for use as display type, not text type.

[/i]Typefaces[/i]: Charlemagne, Copperplate, Exocet, Lithos, Mantinia, Rusticana, Sophia, Trajan


Script: You often see scripts in use on food packaging. Because these faces look "hand made," they tend to give the impression of "homemade" food. Also, scripts are in wide use on greeting cards and wedding invitations to make these items seem like more personalized messages.

Typefaces: Bickham Script, Coronet, Ex Ponto, Mistral, Poetica, Snell Roundhand, Shelley

Miscellaneous:

Blackletter
You can find Blackletter type in use in newspaper mastheads, diplomas and certificates and in tattoos [strangely many tattoos are Blackletter all caps]. And, likely due to the popularity of tattoos, using Blackletter is very much in fashion in typography in recent years.

Typefaces: Clairvaux, Duc de Berry, Fette Fraktur, Goudy Text, Linotext, Wilhelm Klingspor Gotisch

Uncial
Yet another category of hand-drawn letterforms, these are typefaces based on the all caps, rounded writing style used in the Book of Kells. You can sometimes see these faces in use on religious materials and for the signage of Irish pubs.

Typefaces: American Uncial, Neue Hammer Unziale, Omnia

Monospaced
These are typefaces whose character widths are constant. They tend to look somewhat technological and unadorned.

Typefaces: Base Monospace, Courier, Letter Gothic, Prestige Elite, Platelet, OCR-A, OCR-B, Orator

Digital
These are faces that imitate some aspect of digital technology such as bitmapping or optical character recognition [OCR] technology using only straight horizontal and vertical strokes.

Typefaces: OCR-A, Lo Res, New Alphabet

Dingbats
These are fonts containing icons, symbols or pictures rather than letterforms. The word "pi" in the names of some of these comes from the first two letters of "pictogram." Some dingbats are pictograms of telephones, light bulbs, churches, books, etc. The botanical dingbats of leaves or flowers are called fleurons. Dingbats can also include abstract symbols such as check marks, stars, crosses, spirals, etc. Zapf Dingbats is a popular example.
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Brent Sienna
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Re: An update on a classic.

Post by Brent Sienna » Wed Nov 22, 2006 11:23 am

[quote="Lizzegirle";p="694913"]Ahem... Greg does not use Comic Sans. [/quote]

Soooooo... which font DOES he use??
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Re: An update on a classic.

Post by Jin-roh » Thu Dec 07, 2006 7:37 am

Wow. I didn't think it was possible to get so passionate about fonts. Other than the abuse (according to the link) is there some other specific reason? I don't find it hard to read.

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Post by Memo » Thu Dec 07, 2006 7:42 am

It's ugly.

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Post by Jamie Bond » Thu Dec 07, 2006 8:57 am

Comic sans sucks :P

Fonts DO make a big difference for what you are doing, but I am not very educated on them. I just look for what feels right depending on what I am working on.

I never use Comic Sans for ANYTHING, though. I kind of like Tahoma and Bookman Old Style.
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Re: An update on a classic.

Post by Lizzegirle » Thu Dec 07, 2006 9:10 am

[quote="Jin-roh";p="700216"]Wow. I didn't think it was possible to get so passionate about fonts. Other than the abuse (according to the link) is there some other specific reason? I don't find it hard to read.[/quote]

I would have to go into a post that is nearly as long (if not longer) as the previous one. So I am going to be vague.

Comic Sans wasn't properly built. It's characters aren't the correct proportions. It isn't based off of any type of pen-drawn or geometric forms. Pretty much, it was a crappy font that somehow has gained enough popularity to be used everywhere. For the average person, the font is fine. But for those that care about legibility, balance and aesthetics, it's an eyesore.

When it comes to graphic design, there is alot more to it than what you originally would think. You would probably be amazed how much work goes into setting just a paragraph of type that you will easily read and move on. But that's our job, to make a paragraph of type legible enough for you to easily read it and move on.
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Post by Bigity » Thu Dec 07, 2006 1:49 pm

Is that what they teach at college these days? The history of fonts? Egyptian civilization? What this country needs is math, math, science, more math, and science. Oh, and reading/writing skills wouldn't hurt either.

Schools spend too much time on specialized studies that are useful, but do not benefit most graduates.

Man, I'm glad I didn't waste my money on that kind of thing.
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