Well then

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Rorschach
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Well then

Post by Rorschach » Wed Nov 09, 2016 9:10 am

I'm nipping out of the chaos of social media for a moment to listen to the calmer and better informed voices on here.

This Trump thing, eh? Eh? What's that all about then? Is it time to drink the koolaid?

I, in my idealistic ignorance, rather fancy that - like all elected officials - he'll forget half of the campaign promises he made on the way to power. Or that he'll have difficulty getting the wackier of his notions through. Although clearly I know the square root of hee-haw about American politics.

Please someone hold me close to their knowledgeable bosom and whisper comforting sanity to me.
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Deacon
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Re: Well then

Post by Deacon » Wed Nov 09, 2016 9:42 am

While I understand thinking the sky is falling, I'll remind you of the same thing I reminded Trump supporters about when they thought Hillary would win. While you may disagree with or even dislike a president, they're president, not king. While Pence would love to overturn Roe v Wade, he wouldn't be able to even if wanted to. He can do some stuff to make things more difficult if he were president, but not much. Same with Hillary and banning guns.

And my hope and belief, honestly, is that Trump is a uniquely American huckster. Dude has no interest in banning abortion (never did), for example. He has no real interest in undertaking the expensive, logistically nightmarish, and in the end ineffective effort of deporting illegals en masse. He certainly has no interest in fighting to repeal equal rights for gays, either. Remember, this is a New Yorker.

I still think he rather knowingly manipulated and stirred up a bunch of frustrated and in some cases ugly issues and people for his own benefit. And for a lot of people there were legitimate grievances; they clearly weren't all knuckle dragging deplorables. But we'll see. He'll be in office now, and I can easily imagine he won't really start acting on many of the more outlandish things he's said.

The good news is that if nothing else a lot of Democrats (and millennials) will suddenly--and for the first time--start informing themselves on the constitution and the concept of the separation of powers. And for once maybe they'll figure out that expansion and consolidation of power under the executive branch is insidious and requires not just vigilance but sincere regard for the separation of powers to keep it at bay. Because no matter how much you might be a cheerleader for whoever is in charge today, tomorrow is a new day.

And maybe now people will start contemplating the folly of sticking with the current staggered primaries and first-past-the-post mechanism for elected officials. But that's probably too much to ask of people.
The follies which a man regrets the most in his life are those which he didn't commit when he had the opportunity. - Helen Rowland, A Guide to Men, 1922

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Re: Well then

Post by The Cid » Wed Nov 09, 2016 3:27 pm

We deserve this as a country.

We absolutely deserve this, and I hope we hate every minute of it. I hope we hate it, and him, so much that we collectively decide no more.

No more vilifying Americans who disagree with us. No more being afraid of opposition. No more seeking out people on television where we can sit in their choir and be preached to. No more taking a bunch of people in violation of absolutely nothing and turning them into the enemy. It set the stage for a carpetbagger to waltz in and lie to the desperate. And this is the consequences. This is what we wanted our political system to become. Congratulations everyone who hates half of America, you have your wish.

Because it isn't just guaranteed to destroy us, like Lincoln said it absolutely would. But it will do that. I hope people realize that their utter hatred of the "other guys" will be the end of us. We are all on the same team, Republican, Democrat, or those of us who aren't welcome at all in the process. (Those of us who get blamed in close elections, by the way.)

If you hate Democrats, you're wrong and you are hurting America. If you hate Republicans, you are wrong and are hurting America. But in my life, that's how we've been trained to go about politics.

We're supposed to be right. I don't know how people think that some personal ideal makes you right about everything. It doesn't. Your party, your opponent's party, and my party are all wrong more often than we're right. We would, on balance, have to be. Political parties aren't made up of scientists and thought leaders, they're made up of lawyers, politicians, and lobby interests. And we have surrendered our thought and free will to them. To be replaced with the blind passion of a sports fan.

Let me tell you as a sportswriter that we have literally hundreds of teams to choose from.

And most Americans instead preferred the two teams where fanatic passion are counterproductive, dangerous, and lead to this.

We will not bridge the gap. Whatever part of America you're in, you probably hate the other side too much to consider their issues.

We would prefer to elect a socially conservative reality TV host, whose law and order policies will put us in a financial hole (so much for fiscal conservatism from the Republican Party, that notion is officially dead and gone, replaced by military and police interests with palms extended and flat), who will attack minorities and gay people through legislation at every single turn because it's a partisan ideal to hate. We did that yesterday. We rejected reconciliation. We rejected the notion of working with the opposition.

Somehow we get to remain a country when the entire country just voted to reject the notion of working together as United States.

I feel sick. And I feel like blame is omni-directional.
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Hirschof wrote:I'm waiting for day you people start thinking with portals.

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Re: Well then

Post by NorthernComfort » Wed Nov 09, 2016 6:00 pm

This makes 2004 feel like a love tap.

Not much to say. Yesterday was one of the worst days of my life.
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Re: Well then

Post by Seir » Thu Aug 16, 2018 4:40 am

It's going to be almost two years in a couple of months and it's only gotten worse. The guy is a fucking wannabe banana republic dictator.
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Yo Mav, I'm real happy for you and Imma let you finish but Hirschoff had the best sig trends of all time.

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Rorschach
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Re: Well then

Post by Rorschach » Wed Nov 07, 2018 7:05 am

Can someone please explain these midterms to me, in as simple a way as possible?
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Deacon
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Re: Well then

Post by Deacon » Wed Nov 07, 2018 8:59 am

They’re just the next regularly scheduled elections. Elections occur normally at least every 2 years on a regular schedule. During any election, voters have a chance to choose among any offices whose term is coming to a close, everything from local city council to state elected officials to federal representatives and such, up to the president. They also get to vote on any referendums.

These are called the “midterms” because they land on the 2-year cycle between presidential election years. So if 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012 were presidential election years, 2002, 2006, and 2010 are “mid-term” chances to vote on people/things.

There are two houses of Congress, the Senate and the House of Representatives. The Senate is where each state gets exactly 2 senators to represent that state no matter the population, a fixed number (100 total ever since 1959 when Hawaii was admitted as the 50th state). The term for the Senate is 6 years, and they set it up in a staggered rotation so that only about 1/3 of the seats is up for election in any given election year. So generally every election year (basically every even-numbered year) about 33 or 34 Senate seats are available to be voted on.

The House of Representatives on the other hand is tied to population, which didn’t used to be a fixed number, until the early 1900s I think, when they finally capped it at 435 seats, apportioned among the states every 10 years according to the census results. A representative’s term is only 2 years. So every election year, in every state, all the seats are up for grabs. Each state divides itself into “districts” partly for that purpose, so Texas ends up with 36 districts. I happen to live in the 21st district. We appear to have elected representative Chip Roy, a Republican, with a margin of 50.3% to 47.5% over his Democrat rival, a shockingly strong showing for the Democrat. My county is about an 80-20 split Republican-Democrat.

Anyway, because the House comes up for election every single election year, there’s a lot more opportunity for movement there. In the Senate, 2/3rds of seats are still somewhere in the middle of their 6-tear terms, so they’re not available to be voted out. Since the 2016 election, there has been single-party rule, with Republicans having the majority in both the House and Senate as well as the White House. This round of “mid-term” elections resulted in the Democrats barely gaining control of the House, with 26 seats (so far) formerly occupied by Republicans switching hands based on the voters in those districts across the country. In the Senate, Republicans actually *gained* a couple seats.

The finally tally isn’t in yet, but it looks like most of the house seats Democrats claimed were occupied mostly by more moderate Republican voices. Which means that what remains are more hardline partisan Republicans, more right wing extremists.

It’s a little scary, because the partisan talking points have already been decided and fed to the party faithful who have already been parroting them. It’s depressing and distressing to see so many people toss basic thought to the wind.
The follies which a man regrets the most in his life are those which he didn't commit when he had the opportunity. - Helen Rowland, A Guide to Men, 1922

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Re: Well then

Post by The Cid » Wed Nov 07, 2018 8:14 pm

It's also depressing just how many state and even local races were about national issues, often ones that hardly impact that given area, instead of more pressing and immediate matters. Florida's gubernatorial race was essentially about the president and whatever you want to call the Bernie Sanders wing of the political left. Little time or attention was given to things that actually had to do directly with Florida, like a red tide problem ("all the fish are dead") that kinda takes a chunk out of beach tourism.

Fun fact about FL's senate and governor races: The margin of victory in both cases wouldn't be enough to fill up the major college football stadiums in the state. Remember that when the president or anyone else tries to claim this midterm constitutes a mandate from the people.
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Re: Well then

Post by Deacon » Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:21 pm

What’s really depressing is that your post from 2 years ago still holds up. And the worse he gets, the harder his subjects cheer. It’s weird, because if they wanted someone who was the opposite of Obama in every possible aspect other than genetically configuration, that’s what we’ve got with Trump. He’s not someone you can disagree with. He’s someone who invited you to hate him or gtfo.

“From berating CNN's Jim Acosta to calling an African American reporter’s question racist, Trump's latest press conference was petty and vile.”

https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/p ... ps-753033/
The follies which a man regrets the most in his life are those which he didn't commit when he had the opportunity. - Helen Rowland, A Guide to Men, 1922

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Rorschach
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Re: Well then

Post by Rorschach » Sun Nov 11, 2018 9:39 am

Thanks, Deacon. I actually understood some of that which is testimony to your writing.

I had rather understood these results would mean a blow to Trump. Or at least a checking of some of the more distasteful policies.

Is it too early to make predictions for the 2020 election?
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